Injuries on the Slopes

 

As an instructor I was told a proper procedure to follow if one of my students gets hurt during a lesson.  I have never had to use this procedure, but it can be a common occurrence given the riding conditions, level of the rider, and level of the instructor.

 

If the rider gets hurt, but is able to move you should:

Take them inside to ski patrol.

 

If there is more than one student in the lesson, then ask another instructor on the hill to watch your class and take the injured rider to ski patrol.

At Timber Ridge the instructors are at a table just inside the lodge so if an extra instructor can’t be found out on the hill, then you would just need to run in and ask one to come out to watch for a few.

 

If the rider gets hurt and is unable to move you should:

Ask someone on the hill to get ski patrol, whether it be a random rider or another student in your lesson if it’s a class with multiple learners.

Stay with the rider, try to calm them down, and make them lie still.

 

If the instructor gets hurt during the lesson, then they need to have another instructor take over the lesson and go see ski patrol if they can move.  If the instructor is hurt enough to where they can’t move, then the student needs to get the attention of another instructor or rider and get ski patrol.

 

 

Getting hurt is no joke.  The most common areas to get hurt during an introduction lesson are heads, wrists, knees, tailbones, and backs.  Helmets have become more common on the hill not only being worn by beginning riders, but also by instructors and more advanced terrain park riders.

 

People hurt their wrists, knees, and tailbones when they catch their edges and fall.  Wearing wrist guards and knees pads are good ways to minimize wrist and knee injuries.  There really isn’t a good way to stop from hurting your tailbone.  Some companies have started putting extra padding in the knees and butt parts of the snowpants which is helpful, but doesn’t mean that you can’t hurt yourself.

 

 

These sort of injuries are just risks that beginning shredders have to take and luckily if they get hurt they are surrounded by snow so they can ice their boo-boos!

 

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